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Posts Tagged ‘vegetarian’

Ugh. It appears that a weekend of traveling and one drink too many has left me sick. What’s a girl to do?
I have been playing this game all day in bed. Go doggy, go! Gotta say, it’s a good way to amuse myself.

But on the food front:

I’m whipping out one of my favorite vegan cookbooks, How It All Vegan. This cookbook, Garden of Vegan and La Dolce Vegan are my go-to cookbooks and have been with me since high school. They’re well-loved, with oil stains, pages falling out, writing all over my favorite recipes.

When I’m sick, I always get myself some kombucha and mix it with pomegranate juice and nurse the mixture all day. I figure there are enough antioxidants in there to give my body what it needs to fight the ickies. I’m also a fan of, early in the getting-sick process, mincing some garlic and putting it in a spoon, then covering that with honey and swallowing everything. It sounds weird but it is a good way to get raw garlic without killing your stomach.

So I’m whipping up a batch of Jana’s Winter Sicky Soup, which appears in How It All Vegan. I’m hoping it does the trick.

Ingredients:

1/2 medium butternut squash, peeled & cubed
4 medium carrots, sliced
1/2-1 c burdock roots, sliced
1/2 dandelion ROOT (I almost got leaves), chopped
2 tbsp olive oil
1/2 medium white onion, chopped
4 tbsp fresh ginger, grated
8 cloves fresh garlic, chopped
8 c vegetable stock or water
1 tsp cayenne pepper
1 tsp curry powder
pinch of salt
2 tbsp fresh rosemary, chopped
3 lemon slices
4 whole leaves of collard greens, roughly chopped
1/4 c miso
1/4 c green onions, chopped (garnish)

In large soup pot, saute the squash, carrots, and burdock and dandelion roots in oil on medium-high heat for 5-10 minutes or until ingredients are tender. Add the onions, ginger, and garlic and cook 5 minutes more. Pour in the stock and add the cayenne, curry, salt, rosemary, lemon, and collard greens and simmer on medium-low head for 40 minutes. Remove from heat, stir in miso*, and let stand 5 minutes before serving. Garnish with green onions. Makes 4-6 servings.

*Miso should never be boiled, as it will destroy all the good stuff in it.

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I introduce to you, the food that powered me through college:

There’s a reason my breakfast today is arranged in a heart shape: I love this quick, simple, healthy, vegan! breakfast. It requires little hands-on time — perfect for rushing out the door to an 8am class — and is sturdy enough to sit in your stomach until there’s time to get a real meal.

Preparation is simple. Toasted bread (I used sourdough), plus some margarine. I use Earth Balance because it is trans-fat free and the best for any kind of vegan cooking/baking. Once the margarine has melted, sprinkle nutritional yeast on top. The yeast will soak up the moisture from the margarine, and that’s when you add MORE.

The result? A cheesy delicious meal on the go. Please note that it’s really good on bagels. This would also make a good accompaniment to soup, especially if you were to add garlic bread spices.

Hooray Vegan MoFo!

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I just found out today from For the Love of Guava about Vegan MoFo, a blog movement from The Post-Punk Kitchen — the same kids that brought you Veganomicon. This is my most recent vegan cookbook purchase, and a regular in my kitchen, so hell yes I’m in!

The idea is simple: one blog post every weekday for the month of October about vegan food. I’ve been getting back to my vegan roots lately and limiting the amount of dairy I include in my food, in an effort to eat more grains, tofu, vegetables… and not frustrate my digestive system.

So here’s to delicious vegan food! I can’t wait. I retroactively tagged my yummy tofu recipe as Vegan MoFo, since it is totally vegan and incredibly delicious. And in October!

Today’s (vegan!) dinner: Sarah-riffic Fried Tofu, brown rice, miso-tahini sauce (a Veganomicon recipe), kale, and avocado.

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I tell you, lunch is a hard meal for me. I’m hungry, but lazy. I want something tasty but uncomplicated. What’s a girl to do?

Enter today’s tasty lunch creation: a (vegan) tofu avocado sandwich with miso-tahini dressing!

It’s got tofu! Avocado! Delicious spread! Totally filling, totally delicious, totally vegan.

“How can I make this tasty concoction?” you ask. Well. I will tell you. Here is my “recipe,” or at least how-to guide.

Start with the TOFU.
1. Get yerself some tofu. Firm or extra firm, so it’ll hold up to frying. (Silken or soft tofu is best left for smoothies and stuff.)
2. Slice the tofu into 1/2″ rectangles.
3. Mix together some (1/4 c?) soy sauce and some (1/4 c?) lemon juice. You could add minced or powdered garlic if you want. This is your marinade.
4. Let tofu marinate for, well, however long you want. I left it in for about 45 minutes and it got sufficiently tasty.
5. Coat the tofu in nutritional yeast*.
6. Fry the tofu over medium-ish heat in a hot pan with some canola or olive oil until golden brown. Flip. (Lather rinse) repeat.

While the tofu’s marinating, you can mix up your miso-tahini sauce. I got this recipe from Veganomicon, one of my favorite vegan cookbooks.

MISO-TAHINI SAUCE
1/4 c miso (I used white but I’ve used red and brown to fine results)
1/4 c tahini
Mix together with some warm water until desired consistency is reached. Note that this will thicken significantly after being refrigerated. I add olive oil and/or lemon juice to thin it down.
This sauce is good on everything: salads, sandwiches, greens, rice…

From there, put some miso-tahini sauce on your toasty bread (I like sourdough, which is also usually vegan), add some sliced avocado (I used a whole avocado because I LOVE it), and finally put in a tofu slice.

Eat! Nummers. You could also add sliced tomato (if it’s in season) and/or some lettuce for added vegetable points.

*Nutritional yeast is yellow/orange-ish flakey stuff you can get at a health food store. It has a cheesy flavor and is also really good for you. Not the same as yeast you use in bread. Bad mistake.

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Today’s blog post is brought to you by the color burgundy.

These are some cranberry shelling beans I bought at the farmers’ market. Check out the pods! I think they were referred to as “tongues of fire” beans, and I couldn’t resist. The beans have beautiful cranberry speckles when shelled. Unfortunately, the speckles disappear when cooked.

Pretty pretty. I cooked these for 20-30 minutes in boiling water. I mixed them with some cooked green beans, lemon juice, parmesan, and salt and pepper.

We had a fabulous vegetarian dinner last night, totally veggielicious:

Sorry for the picture quality! The beans are in the lower left-hand corner there. In the lower right is some spaghetti squash and yellow squash, with a little bit of Parmesan. The upper right-hand is the tomato salad I love to make, and the upper left is some red fruit: Flavor King pluots, raspberries, and strawberries. Nothing added!

Seems like burgundy is a serious color theme in my life lately. I made some “sun-dried” tomatoes in my oven — sliced up about 1/2″ thick, on aluminum foil, for 8+ hours. I’m looking forward to using them in the winter:

And hey! I’ve started knitting a February Lady Sweater, just like everyone else it seems. I was inspired by brainylady’s post about it, and could no longer resist. I’m not one for knitting sweaters usually, but I think this one might just turn out super cute! I was really drawn to the shape of it, which seems incredibly flattering, and the prospect of picking out really cute wood buttons for it. I’m using Cascade 220 wool:

I guess Autumn truly is here. I can’t wait for leaf-crunching season to really set in.

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In the vein of talking about tomatoes a LOT, I offer you a new and innovative way to enjoy tomatoes!

After a few weeks of making soup out of tomatoes, eating tomatoes on bagels, making pie out of tomatoes, putting tomatoes on pasta, drying tomatoes (more later), I’m still not over them. Although I’m investing a lot of energy in preserving the Early Girls for the off season, I want to savor some of them as unadulterated as possible. I’m not yet part of the camp that eats tomatoes like apples, probably because I’m still recovering from eating many a mediocre tomato in my day. That having been said, these tomatoes are GOOD, and I want to really taste them.

So! A simple recipe for using up some tomatoes. Y’all should know that I feel more masterful in the kitchen when working without a recipe — responding to the ingredients that I have rather than blindly throwing “three tomatoes” into a bowl. The recipes that I put out there end up being a reflection of that. Check out what you have, inspect your feelings on correct tomato-to-lettuce ratio, and go from there.

And, of course, the better ingredients you can obtain — organic, locally farmed — the better this will taste.

For a generous one-person salad, you will need:
One slice of bread, toasted — I used Russian Rye, which yielded great results.
Two-ish tomatoes
Lettuce — I used baby greens because I don’t like ribs. Choose something green, not iceberg.
Onion
Mayo (can use Vegenaise to make vegan, or plain yogurt if you don’t like mayo)
Balsamic vinegar (or red wine vinegar if you prefer)
Olive oil
Salt
Pepper

1. While toasting the bread, cut tomatoes into quarters or eighths. Leave seeds and squishy stuff in.
2. Tomatoes, lettuce, onion (cut into thin rounds, amount per your onion preference) all go into a bowl.
3. Take toasty bread and cut into pieces roughly 1″ square. Add to salad mixture.
4. Add dollop or two of mayo — maybe 2 tbsp, depending on how much you like or are grossed out by mayo.
5. Add splash of balsamic and drizzle of olive oil, salt and pepper to taste.

And the most important step:

6. Toss and let sit for a few minutes. The bread will get a little squishy and really really tasty.

Basil would go well in this salad, also. I’d recommend against adding other veggies, in the interest of highlighting the simple tomato + tangy flavors.

This recipe inspired by a recipe in my UCSC CSA cookbook.

Enjoy! A fabulous way to savor the last fruits of summer…

P.S. Yes that IS Animal Vegetable Miracle that I’m reading, and I’m on the tomato chapter! Talk about good timing. I highly recommend the book to, well, anyone, and will talk more about it when I’m finished.

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Worked the farmers’ market again with much success — but this time for cash instead of produce. So, no insane amounts of tomatoes this week, which is a convenient but much less tasty thing.

A friend of mine has an insane apple tree in her front yard and we’ve had a few apple-preserving sessions. We made some applesauce and crisps and pies, and I still have a few left over.

This picture was taken after washing, before our last pie-making session. I don’t have quite that many left right now, but I still have a giant bowl full of them. I’ll probably make applesauce with them, as I’m running out of space in the freezer that’s not really mine.

When I got back from the market dead tired this afternoon — my alarm failed to go off which resulted in me being “late” at, oh, 6:45 in the morning — I was hungry (another result of rushing out the door). I’ve got lots of squash to make and a few other things, but I wanted something simple and tasty. My UCSC CSA cookbook came to the rescue! I just purchased their other cookbook yesterday at the plant sale (I own one already and loved it so much I decided I needed its older sibling). In the first few pages of the cookbook is a recipe for “Quick Sauteed Apples,” which was just the ticket this afternoon.

I didn’t make this up myself, but the recipe is so simple I feel okay about re-posting it here. I mean, really, you just take some apples, core them and slice them up about 1/4″ thick. I left skins on for added nutritional value. Heat some butter or margarine in a pan (I used Earth Balance which is an incredible vegan alternative to butter), and add some brown sugar. Again, I used two small-ish apples, so I added 1 Tbsp each of margarine and sugar. Toss in the apples and saute over medium-ish heat for 5-10 minutes. Add some cinnamon at the end, and your kitchen smells divine.

I’d say it made enough for 1-3 people, depending on how much you like apples. I ate them as is and they were mighty tasty — kind of like apple pie but without, you know, the pie part. I bet they’d taste great with some oatmeal (real, steel-cut oatmeal, that is), and the cookbook recommends them over some ice cream. An incredibly satisfying breakfast.

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