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Posts Tagged ‘crafting’

Oh, wow. It’s been a while. Well, I guess that’s just how it goes. Anyway, here’s my justification: aside from selling books, I’ve been working on making money from my knitting. That’s right, Knits With Carrots is slowly but surely making its way to the necks of people near you. My first design (!) is a little neckwarmer that I’ve made at least 15 of by now (no joke), so that’s been eating up my time like crazy. Pictures soon, and I think I may make it into a pattern to share.

It’s pretty cool designing knit things. I mean, one, it means I can sell it, and two, it makes me all inspired to make more things. And it’s getting cold! So these things I’m going to be making will be accessories galore. I can’t wear knit garments every day — I barely justify wearing my favorite knit socks multiple days in a row — but wearing the same scarf over and over? Totally acceptable.

Ramble ramble, but: one of the best (and totally unanticipated) perks of putting out into the world that I am a Serious and Professional Knitter is that a lot of my friends are saying, “Hi, can I pay you to knit things for me?”, and the answer is pretty much always a “Hell yes!” So I have thigh-high legwarmers on the docket, among other things. Maybe not cost effective, but it feels good to get paid for my labor and to keep my friends’ extremities warm. And have money to pay for hot chocolate while I, you guessed it, knit these freakin’ neckwarmers. Oh wait, let me edit that: these freakin’ now-available-in-a-real-boutique neckwarmers.

Hell yes.

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My New Years’s Resolutions are a break from the past — instead of resolutions that I’ll fall out of by February and feel guilty for all year, these are designed to be nice and compassionate with myself, and focus on cultivating this I already like about myself and do regularly.

So.

1. Take another stab at the book-a-week thing. It was a good challenge and I think that, especially working in a bookstore, I stand a fair chance. Besides, “failing” at this resolution is still a success.

2. Keep pushing myself to eat more fresh produce — it’s difficult when I’m working, but I feel like I could do a few dinners a week. If nothing else, get some veggies into that pasta.

3. Be more alert to when I need to take care of myself physically — getting more sleep! — and emotionally — allowing myself introvert time. 2009 is going to be the year of compassion compassion compassion.

4. Devote January to completing languishing knitting projects. After that, all bets are off — I need to remember that knitting is something for me, and feeling guilty over how many half-completed pairs of socks I have isn’t doing me any favors. That having been said, I would like more complete pairs of socks.

5. I would really like to get into bookmaking this year.

I think that’s it? I guess it would be good to floss, too…

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knitting-for-good

I’ve spent the past few days working through my copy of Knitting for Good, by Betsy Greer of Craftivism. (This is one of the benefits of working in a bookstore!) I’d like to fill you all in on what a great book this is, and some of the reasons why I think it’s a really important contribution to the growing canon of knitting writing.

Greer’s book focuses on the importance and significance of knitting. While I may be preaching to the choir on this one, I think that an emphasis on knitting as a productive practice is necessary, when many people see knitting as a non-essential hobby. Knitting for Good knocks down this assumption immediately, using its relationship to feminism — much to my delight — to illustrate the good that can come from picking up the needles. The common misconception is that knitting is an idle act, “women’s work” meant to pass time; Betsy Greer asserts that just the act of knitting itself is an act of healing, of meditation, and of self-love. I’m sure all of us who knit (or do any kind of craft) understand this: to sit down and make something is to assert my ability to shape my world, to create something as I want it, and to be present in what I’m doing.

I love that Knitting for Good links feminism and domestic arts like crafting. I know I went through my feminist crisis when I got super into things like nesting; Betsy Greer will have us understand that knitting or cooking or quilting is not an act of disobeying feminism, but rather celebrating its tenets:

This domestic reclamation can be celebrated with pride and heads held high… As a direct result of years of hard-working women who proved themselves just as capable as men of earning wages, we now have the freedom to make money for ourselves and then knit a sweater out of expensive cashmere bought with our own paycheck… When we don an apron and start to cook or take measurements for a garment, we can be empowered by the notion that we are self-sufficient and choosing this path instead of following society’s expectations… Feminism has given us the strength to explore our otions instead of being concerned about regressing or kowtowing to cultural standards.

Right on! That’s what I loved about this book — its continual insistence on the fact that the act of creation is important and productive and deserving of respect.

Knitting for Good is constructed to reflect an expanding of personal borders that happens with knitting. First, the emphasis on knitting as a healing act for the individual; from there, the empowered individual has new means with which to interact with family and community. I myself have benefited from this aspect of craft and knitting: the ability to connect with my grandmother and aunt through crochet and cross-stitch and quilts and how we make things for our living environment. It truly is a unique and special connection, and Knitting for Good will have us remember that.

Knitting and craft can be used, once connected with a community, to benefit that community — I especially like Betsy’s focus on the more forgotten members of society, like the homeless, elderly, and abandoned animals. Knitting for these people gets to be a way to connect with them and recognize their humanity, becoming a political act of insisting on the importance of each member of a community. I also appreciated that Knitting for Good includes why focusing on buying homemade is important — in a time of large chains, supporting your local independent store and artisan is an intensely political act that will ultimately benefit the community. Buying local, Greer points out, supports those local crafters who are enriching the community with their art.

In short (ok, not so short), this is a lovely book with many sturdy take-home messages, as well as personal reflections and patterns that will inspire you to pick up your needles for a good cause. I highly recommend it as a personal read — it will make you feel fantastic about your choice to be a crafter — and I really recommend it as a gift for that crafty person in your life*. This book is an act of love, for crafting and for the world at large.

*Hey, while you’re at it, keep with the message of Knitting for Good and make this an act of love and politics by getting your copy at your local independent bookstore instead of Amazon or Borders!

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